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B.S. in Liberal Studies: Curriculum

Curriculum Details

120 total credits required

Greenville University’s online B.S. in Liberal Studies curriculum incorporates topics from diverse topic areas and scholarly disciplines. You will work closely with an expert faculty advisor to ensure your course plan aligns with your academic and career goals.

The liberal arts degree requirements include 32 major credits. In addition to courses required for the major, you will need to complete general education and elective courses for a total of 120 credits.

The customizable nature of the B.S. in Liberal Studies program allows you to design an interdisciplinary degree and make connections between multiple subject areas. An internship is built into the liberal arts degree requirements, so you learn to apply your studies in a professional setting. Students who transfer the maximum amount of credits can complete their program in just 1 to 2 years.

Required Course

An introductory course in the craft of writing poetry, fiction, and non-fiction with careful consideration of published works, writing exercises, and workshops in each genre.

In this class students will learn about the Liberal Studies degree program and its emphasis on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary learning. They will consider how different disciplines approach scholarship in different ways, using different sources of evidence, tools and skills. Liberal Studies majors will create a course plan that outlines the courses they will take to complete the Liberal Studies degree. Students will consider these factors – their prior coursework, interests, personal and career goals, vocational sense of calling and timeline for completing their degree. They will also create a portfolio that they will maintain throughout their degree program.

In this class students will integrate the knowledge they gained in their degree program through the unique course plan they chose. Students will write a synthesis paper that summarizes the way in which their course plan led to a degree that is cohesive and meets their goals. Selecting artifacts (papers, projects, course assignments) from their portfolio as evidence, they will describe how the courses they chose equipped them with tools, skills and a knowledge base particular disciplines. Finally, they will appraise how interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary study brought them to new perspectives on a subject that is relevant to their academic and/or vocational interests.

Each department offers a practicum or internship course numbered 405. In this course, the student applies theories and skills learned in the major. Each experience should include significant learning opportunities related to the student’s major field. Two supervisors are involved, a work supervisor and an academic supervisor. Registration must occur prior to the activity. Forty to sixty hours of work experience is required for each credit awarded. The experience may be paid or unpaid. Letter grades will be assigned unless otherwise stated in the departmental description. Students must consult with their academic supervisor at least twice during the experience. A learning experience summary paper following departmental guidelines is required as well as a final interview with the academic supervisor. A maximum of twelve credits may be applied to the degree.

Lower Division Arts & Humanities – Choose 1

An elementary study of the formal and historical aspects of architecture, sculpture, painting, and music and an examination of their relation to Western civilization at its high points. Meets the general education creative and performing arts requirement.

This course introduces the student to the central story of the Old Testament by examining its characters, events, unifying themes, and literary characteristics. Meets the general education biblical studies requirement.

The course is a rapid survey of the books of the New Testament, focusing primarily on their content and theology. The course will also acquaint the student with the political, social, and religious environment of the New Testament period and introduce the student to issues of authorship, dating, transmission, and canon. Meets the general education biblical studies requirement.

Course description coming soon.

Lower Division Social Sciences or Business – Choose 1

Nature and purpose of accounting; basic accounting concepts and procedures, double entry bookkeeping, methods of processing, summarizing, and classifying financial data; balance sheets and income statements.

What makes some for-profit businesses and not-for-profit organizations excel while other fail to thrive? Often, it’s due to the quality of management within the organization. Management of people is a distinct skill set that is critically important, and these skills can be studied, understood, and practiced. In this course, students will learn the elements of business management, the theory behind them and practical tools with which to apply them. Key topics such as communication, leadership, teamwork, conflict management, change, and more will be covered. No matter where a person works or volunteers, they will be able to contribute to the success of any organization when they have a clear understanding of management theory and techniques.

An advanced survey course focusing on the description and interrelationships of the many agencies and institutions which comprise criminal justice (e.g., justice systems, law enforcement, corrections, etc.) Agencies and institutions will be studied in their historical and social contexts and will be further examined by way.

This course delivers economics from individually focused, microeconomics to the infrastructure focused, macroeconomics. This semester will provide a foundation for both business and non-business majors.

This course is structured to be a more detailed, deeper coverage of both micro- and macroeconomics. This semester builds upon the broad, fast-moving introduction to the micro- and macroeconomics course. This course covers applied economics, or the rest of the economics story for business majors. At the completion of the course, students will have had comprehensive instruction and application of micro, macro, U.S., and global economics.

This introductory course examines business from an entrepreneurial perspective. It will provide students with an introduction to the potential and pitfalls of entrepreneurship and its impact on the economic development within a community. Throughout the course, students will examine the various methods for starting up, managing, and financing a new business enterprise. This process will culminate in the development of a viable business plan. The overarching goal of this course is to familiarize the student with business terminology in order to introduce him or her to the business program at Greenville University.

Marketing is not just about advertising or social media posts. It’s a broad field encompassing all aspects of discovering customer – consumer and organizational buyers – wants and needs and then meeting them. Setting the mission and strategies, understanding buyer behavior, reaching global markets, researching market options, and making decisions concerning the 4 Ps of marketing – product, price, place, promotion – are all critical areas to understand. Knowing terms and concepts is not enough, however, so application opportunities are given throughout the course. No matter in what field or in what position a person finds themselves, marketing is a part of it.

This course introduces psychology as a science and emphasizes the interaction of social, cognitive, emotional, motivational, and organizational approaches to understanding human behavior. Discussions within this class include Christian perspectives on current issues in human behavior, cognition, and motivation.

This course investigates the spiritual, mental, physical, social, and professional aspects of adult life. The course provides resources for becoming more successful citizens of an aging and changing information society. The course presents an overview of adult development theory and what it means to age successfully.

MATH or Global Language – Choose 1

A few mathematical concepts selected to give students in many fields an appreciation of the beauty, extent, and vitality of mathematics. Some insight into the historical development of these concepts. The emphasis is not on developing computational skills. About one-third of the course is devoted to the basic ideas of probability and statistical thinking. Does not count toward the mathematics major.

Lab Science – Choose 1

The aim of this course is to engage the student to contemporary theories and concepts about nutrition. This will include diet and exercise, pathology of eating disorders, and the effect of diet on emotional, mental, and spiritual health. Students will also begin analyzing the source of information. At the end of the course, the student will have acquired and discussed a number of current issues and be able to have an informed and logical view, and will understand the fundamentals of nutrition across the lifespan.

Upper Division Arts & Humanities – Choose 1

A study of European and American art and architectural movements beginning with Expressionism and Cubism and continuing through the most recent developments. Meets the general education creative and performing arts requirement

African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.

Upper Division Social Sciences or Business – Choose 1

This course is about applying analytical theory of business decision-making to provide products and service design, capacity planning, process and location selection, inventory and supply management, quality assurance, and scheduling. These real-world management tools will heighten the comprehension of business applications and provide a competitive edge in school and beyond.

Students will understand the forces of globalization, why nations trade, problems of trade restrictions and international payments, and multinational corporations as international change agents. They will work from the manager’s perspective to discover how working internationally affects the functional areas of business through influences of the land, the political environment, and the cultural heritage of the people.

This course examines how national and local managers explain the development of their careers with a particular emphasis on leadership development, ethics, and the integration of faith in their management practice. These, together with the course material and group projects, help students develop appropriate career skills. In addition to the weekly speaker summaries, students write a business case study, make microfinance loans to overseas entrepreneurs, and develop individual career plans, resumes, and job search skills.

This course will provide an overview of vice and narcotics crimes. These crimes deal with issues which are policed based on their moral ramifications. This study will examine how certain behaviors become taboo by cultural standards, how they are criminalized, and what happens to those who are convicted of such crimes. During the course, students will learn about how police agencies attempt to mitigate threats to the United States.

In this course, students will learn what is required to provide ethical and effective leadership within a law enforcement agency while building trust between citizens and police officers. The course will examine various policing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. You will also learn about the basic administrative responsibilities required of any law enforcement agency including planning, budgeting, organizational design, and assessment. We will also examine the important area of human resource management concerning the recruiting and hiring of personnel. Lastly, you will come to understand the concepts and principles that are essential in leading others in a way that inspires them to want to follow you.

This course will introduce students to ethics and how it applies to, and is applied within, criminal justice. This course will explore and analyze ethical dilemmas. This course will consider the roles of individuals and professional organizations and agencies when confronted with ethical dilemmas. Additionally, this course will discuss ethics in community relations, ethics in criminal justice laws, the philosophy of punishment, and procedures and civil liability in law enforcement and correctional environments. Finally, this course will explore the standards and codes of professional responsibility in criminal justice professions (e.g., Law Enforcement Code of Ethics, ABA Standards of Professional Responsibility, American Jail Association Code of Ethics for Jail Officers, and the American Correctional Association Code of Ethics.)

A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviance and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for the students focusing on criminal justice generally as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined.

Beginning with theory as taught in MRKT 201 and ECON 102, students deal with selected marketing cases and learn to apply their theoretical principles. Work is both individual and in groups and includes the creation and development of a new product.

Students examine group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on the principles of group dynamics, problem-solving and decision-making, and the diagnosis and resolution of conflict.

This course presents an introduction to social psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project.

This course introduces students to the major schools of theory in the field of personality psychology. Research on the physiological processes that underlie the phenomenon of personality with also be addressed. Students discuss the assumptions of each orientation; each student clarifies his or her own value system and foundation in faith with respect to the theories covered. A comprehensive model of personality is created by students.

In this course, students will be introduced to the field of health psychology through an exploration of the physiological basis of energy regulation through diet, exercise, and lifestyle management. Contemporary research on self-regulation and motivated cognition, research from neuropsychology, positive psychology, and emerging trends in biophysical information processing are included in the projects students undertake to map their own self-regulatory health behaviors.

The history of psychology is traced from origins in Western philosophy to its present position among the sciences. Students develop a firm grasp of the major contributors to psychology and the key schools of thought within the field of psychology. Open to upper division students.

This course introduces abnormal behavior and addresses the different perspectives regarding what constitutes “abnormality.” Causes, developmental courses, treatments, and outcomes of the major categories of mental disorders are studied from epidemiological, clinical, and phenomenological perspectives.

Upper Division Electives – Choose 2

A study of European and American art and architectural movements beginning with Expressionism and Cubism and continuing through the most recent developments. Meets the general education creative and performing arts requirement

This course is about applying analytical theory of business decision-making to provide products and service design, capacity planning, process and location selection, inventory and supply management, quality assurance, and scheduling. These real-world management tools will heighten the comprehension of business applications and provide a competitive edge in school and beyond.

Students will understand the forces of globalization, why nations trade, problems of trade restrictions and international payments, and multinational corporations as international change agents. They will work from the manager’s perspective to discover how working internationally affects the functional areas of business through influences of the land, the political environment, and the cultural heritage of the people.

This course examines how national and local managers explain the development of their careers with a particular emphasis on leadership development, ethics, and the integration of faith in their management practice. These, together with the course material and group projects, help students develop appropriate career skills. In addition to the weekly speaker summaries, students write a business case study, make microfinance loans to overseas entrepreneurs, and develop individual career plans, resumes, and job search skills.

This course will provide an overview of vice and narcotics crimes. These crimes deal with issues which are policed based on their moral ramifications. This study will examine how certain behaviors become taboo by cultural standards, how they are criminalized, and what happens to those who are convicted of such crimes. During the course, students will learn about how police agencies attempt to mitigate threats to the United States.

In this course, students will learn what is required to provide ethical and effective leadership within a law enforcement agency while building trust between citizens and police officers. The course will examine various policing strategies and the advantages and disadvantages of each strategy. You will also learn about the basic administrative responsibilities required of any law enforcement agency including planning, budgeting, organizational design, and assessment. We will also examine the important area of human resource management concerning the recruiting and hiring of personnel. Lastly, you will come to understand the concepts and principles that are essential in leading others in a way that inspires them to want to follow you.

This course will introduce students to ethics and how it applies to, and is applied within, criminal justice. This course will explore and analyze ethical dilemmas. This course will consider the roles of individuals and professional organizations and agencies when confronted with ethical dilemmas. Additionally, this course will discuss ethics in community relations, ethics in criminal justice laws, the philosophy of punishment, and procedures and civil liability in law enforcement and correctional environments. Finally, this course will explore the standards and codes of professional responsibility in criminal justice professions (e.g., Law Enforcement Code of Ethics, ABA Standards of Professional Responsibility, American Jail Association Code of Ethics for Jail Officers, and the American Correctional Association Code of Ethics.)

A course designed to investigate delinquency, including juvenile deviance and juvenile crime. Applicable theories and models of delinquency will be investigated, as will social construction of delinquency. The course is appropriate for the students focusing on criminal justice generally as well as social work. Professional implications will also be examined.

African American History I (1492-1860) explores the history of American slavery from its beginnings in the West Indies through colonization and up to the Civil War. The course examines the Atlantic slave trade (until its abolition in 1808), domestic slavery in America, the political and ideological divide within America (during this time period) over the issue of slavery, and the efforts of American and British abolitionists to end slavery.

Beginning with theory as taught in MRKT 201 and ECON 102, students deal with selected marketing cases and learn to apply their theoretical principles. Work is both individual and in groups and includes the creation and development of a new product.

Students examine group behavior and how group functioning affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis is placed on the principles of group dynamics, problem-solving and decision-making, and the diagnosis and resolution of conflict.

This course presents an introduction to social psychology by exploring theories and research related to social perceptions, social influence, and social relations. Major topics to be covered in the course include, but are not limited to, social influence processes, interpersonal attraction, group behavior, aggression, conformity, and attitude formation and change. Students will further explore these topics by designing and conducting a social psychological research project.

In this course, students will be introduced to the field of health psychology through an exploration of the physiological basis of energy regulation through diet, exercise, and lifestyle management. Contemporary research on self-regulation and motivated cognition, research from neuropsychology, positive psychology, and emerging trends in biophysical information processing are included in the projects students undertake to map their own self-regulatory health behaviors.

The history of psychology is traced from origins in Western philosophy to its present position among the sciences. Students develop a firm grasp of the major contributors to psychology and the key schools of thought within the field of psychology. Open to upper division students.

This course introduces abnormal behavior and addresses the different perspectives regarding what constitutes “abnormality.” Causes, developmental courses, treatments, and outcomes of the major categories of mental disorders are studied from epidemiological, clinical, and phenomenological perspectives.

This course introduces students to the major schools of theory in the field of personality psychology. Research on the physiological processes that underlie the phenomenon of personality with also be addressed. Students discuss the assumptions of each orientation; each student clarifies his or her own value system and foundation in faith with respect to the theories covered. A comprehensive model of personality is created by students.

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